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  • An argot is a language primarily developed to disguise conversation, originally because of a criminal enterprise, though the term is also used loosely to refer to informal jargon.
  • Imprecare invano, gridare inutilmente contro qualcuno che è lontano e non può, perciò, sentirci o che non se ne preoccupa più di tanto.
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  • so plentiful as to be nothing special; common. Am.Eng.
    Example 1: Reality TV shows are a dime a dozen these days.

    Example 2: There are so many Starbucks coffee shops in Manhattan, they're a dime a dozen.
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
    • Context This expression comes from the fact that a "dime" is worth only ten cents (very little value)
  • to stop an activity for the rest of the night. Am.Eng.
    Example 1: We spent a few hours walking around downtown Chicago. It was so cold that we were ready to call it a night by nine o'clock.

    Example 2: Let's call it a night and meet back at the office at seven o'clock tomorrow morning to finish preparing our report.
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
    • Context There is also the expression "to call it a day" which means to stop activity for the day.
  • to make someone angry. Am.Eng.
    Example 1: Jenny didn't vote for Nicole. That really burns Nicole up.

    Example 2: I can't believe Kristen and Andrew didn't invite us to their wedding. That really burns me up!
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
  • to exaggerate; to make more of something than one should. Am.Eng.
    Example 1: They sent a 12 year-old boy to jail for biting his babysitter? Don't you think they're blowing things out of proportion?

    Example 2: Sally called the police when her neighbor's party got too loud. I think that was blowing things out of proportion.
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
  • So what? That doesn't really matter. Am.Eng.
    Example 1: You won five dollars in the lottery? Big deal!

    Example 2: Your father has a job with a big company in New York City? Big deal!
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
  • In a more fortunate position. Am-Eng.
    Example 1:
    We're better off leaving for France on Thursday evening, so we can spend the entire weekend there.

    Example 2:
    If you're interested in studying languages, you'd be better off attending Northwestern University than the University of Chicago.
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Language Type Colloquial
    • Definition Type Idiom
    • Field General
    • Context This expression is often used with conditional tense (would), especially when you're giving advice: "you would be better off doing something" or "you'd be better off doing something."
  • An argot is a language primarily developed to disguise conversation, originally because of a criminal enterprise, though the term is also used loosely to refer to informal jargon.
    Details:
    • Language English
    • Definition Type Word
    • Field General
  • Imprecare invano, gridare inutilmente contro qualcuno che è lontano e non può, perciò, sentirci o che non se ne preoccupa più di tanto.
    Details:
    • Definition Type Idiom